Irish Film Archive in Dublin 2

Irish Film Archive is located in Dublin 2 (county of Dublin )

Address: 6 Eustace Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
Postcode:

Position on map:

Phone: 01 6795744
E-mail: info@irishfilm.ie

The IFI Irish Film Archive is part of the Irish Film Institute, Ireland’s national cultural institute for film. The IFI is based in a converted 17th Century Quaker Meeting House, it comprises 3 cinemas, a Film/book shop, a Café Bar and is wheel chair accessible. As part of the Irish Film Institute, Ireland’s national cultural institution for film the IFI Irish Film Archive acquires, preserves and makes available Ireland’s moving image heritage and related materials. Since its establishment in the mid 1980s it has built up a collection of approximately 30,000 cans of film, and 20,000 tapes predominantly made in or about Ireland, or by Irish producers abroad . A complementary collection of documents, posters, images are held in the Paper Collection and the Tiernan MacBride library holds a wealth of published material on Irish and international cinema. These collections are held in custom-built, climate-controlled vaults at the IFI premises in Temple Bar, designed especially for viewers’ access and long-term preservation. The Archive collection is a unique cultural and historical resource reflecting indigenous film production from 1897 to the present day. The changing landscape of the Irish nation has been captured alongside changing attitudes, customs and social conditions. Amateur films, newsreels, sporting and social events are preserved alongside feature films and documentaries. The work of such luminaries as John Boorman, Neil Jordan and Jim Sheridan is held with films made within local communities and by amateur filmmakers. The most important social, political and historical events of the last century are represented, enriching our understanding of this period and enabling us to connect with our past. The material safe-guarded by the Archive is a vivid and tangible document of Ireland’s past and present and chronicles the development of modern Ireland at a time of unprecedented change.


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